3d Printed By Monoqool: No Boundaries

3D PRINTED BY MONOQOOL: NO BOUNDARIES

With its focus on outstanding functionality and very lightweight contemporary design, the 3D printed eyewear collection at MONOQOOL – and models such as Avalanche, DK and DB – exemplify the innovation and creativity behind this ground-breaking technology. “Aesthetics, supreme comfort, and long-lasting functionality, all in one product! With 3D printing, we are in a position to be really creative with the shapes and colours of the eyewear, without ever compromising on frame fit and function,” says Allan Petersen, CEO at MONOQOOL.

MONOQOOL DK1611
MONOQOOL DK1611

In the season’s Monoqool collection, models Avalanche, DK and DB represent the great advantage of being able to create innovative shapes that are very sleek yet strong and long-lasting in terms of their flexibility and wearability. “We have complete freedom in our design work, and yet we can come up with technical solutions that have never been seen or imagined before,” says Petersen. “All Monoqool frames benefit from a screwless design, with hinges that perform with simplicity and strength”.

MONOQOOL YM2066
MONOQOOL YM2066

Developed since its inception in 2008, the frames today are geared up for the modern consumer, enhancing facial features whilst performing with the utmost comfort in the design.

MONOQOOL AH2012
MONOQOOL AH2012

Model Yumi from the Wire series shows how 3D printing can create something light and really comfortable and long-lasting – as well as stylistically cool. The technical innovation is almost hidden to the wearer. The two 3D printed rims are cleverly held together with 2 wire strips, which are fixed together inside the end piece of the front – – and cleverly hidden away. The Wire series features a very simple screwless hinge designed to stand the test of time.

MONOQOOL DB1336
MONOQOOL DB1336

Sustainable advantages are also a priority with 3D printed production at the Danish company. Monoqool glasses are made in Europe on site at the company headquarters in Denmark. The frames are made to order reducing excess production and waste. “We have also developed a production method where we are able to re-use 98% of all the raw material left after making the glasses,” explains Petersen. “If you compare that with the production of acetate, where 85% of all raw material is disposed of, this results in another strong benefit of 3D printing our frames.” See the entire Monoqool line by visiting their website monoqool.com.

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